DemDaily: Where We Won

November 8, 2017

Bringing home the blue wave ...

In the first full election since Donald Trump took office, Democrats won both Virginia and New Jersey gubernatorial contests, and scored victories across the country in mayoral and legislative seats.

No matter how you spin it, the results were a referendum on the White House and a very public rebuke of its chief occupant.  The outcome also provided a much-needed boost and political comeback for a Democratic party that has pledged reform.


56th Governor: Phil Murphy 55.6%-42.3%
Lt. Governor:   Sheila Oliver
(first African American Lt. Gov)

11th Senate District: Vin Gopal
Hoboken Mayor: Ravinder Bhalla*
(first Sikh Mayor elected in NJ)


Virginia Results (New York Times)

In the largest pickup for Virginia Democrats since 1899, they won all three statewide races and made major gains in the state legislature.

73rd Governor: Ralph Northam  54%-45%
Lt. Governor: Justin Fairfax (second African American to win post)
State Attorney General: Mark Herring

House of Delegates 
Control of the Virginia House went from 66R/34D to 51R/49D, with Democrats picking up 15 House of Delegates seats - just two seats shy of flipping the House to Democrats.

House District 2: Jennifer Carroll Foy
House District 10: Wendy Goodits

House District 12: Chris Hurst
House District 13: Danica Roem
(first openly Transgender State Legislator)
House District 21: Kelly Fowler
House District 31: Elizabeth Guzman
House District 32: David Reid
House District 42: Kathy Tran
(first Asian-American Woman in House)
House District 50: Lee Carter

New Delegate Danica Roem

House District 51: Hala Ayala
House District 67: Karrie Delaney
House District 68: Dawn Adams
House District 72: Schuyler VanValkenberg
House District 73: Deborah Rodman
House District 85: Cheryl Turpin

Just a few of the Higlights
Where Dems flipped seats from red to blue or *held the seat
North Carolina
Charlotte Mayor: Vi Lyles in Charlotte
(first African American Woman Mayor)
Fayetteville Mayor: Mitch Colvin
New Hampshire
Manchester Mayor: Joyce Craig (first ever female Mayor)
House District 15: Erika Connors, House District 1: Brian Sullivan*
Miami Mayor: Francis Suarez*,  St. Petersburg Mayor: Rick Kriseman*
Boston Mayor: Marty Walsh*
St.Paul Mayor: Melvin Carter (first African American Mayor)
New York
New York City Mayor: Bill de Blasio*
House District 117: Deborah Gonzalez, House District 119: Jonathan Wallace
House District 109: Sara Cambensy
Washington State
Seattle: Jenny Durkan (first openly lesbian Mayor)


With re-counts underway in four additional Republican-held House Districts, House Democrats may still have a shot at control. Still contested: HD 27 (R-Robinson, D-Barnett), HD 28 (R-Thomas, D-Cole), HD 40 (R-Hugo, D-Tanner) and
HD 94 (R-Yancey, D-Simonds).

Winning governorships and state legislatures will be critical to control of the 2020 Census and Congressional redistricting -- as most new state maps are drawn by state legislatures.

Although the political party outside the White House usually benefits in mid-term elections, the sweep in Virginia, and victories in municipal races across the country, are a clear sign that the GOP is in trouble going into 2018.

Congratulations to all!



Connecting you to The Party
Connecting you to Each Other

Kimberly Scott

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Sources: New York Times, Washington Examiner, ABC, MSNBC, WTOP, AP, US News

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